BREAKING, AG Bill Barr Ends Census Citizenship Question Debate, Says It Is Legal

Posted by Jimmy Minnish on July 8, 2019 under Links | Be the First to Comment

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Attorney General Bill Barr told the Associated Press that he believes the Trump administration can legally add the citizenship question to the 2020 census, even though the Supreme Court recently, narrowly, ruled against it’s inclusion.

Barr said he has been in regular contact with the President on the citizenship question. Barr told the AP “I agree with him that the Supreme Court decision was wrong.”

He added there is “an opportunity potentially to cure the lack of clarity that was the problem and we might as well take a shot at doing that.”

Barr refused to provided additional details on how the citizenship question might get added to the census.

Reports have indicated that the President is looking to sign an executive orderdirecting the Commerce Department to include the question.

Civil rights groups and some states strongly object to the citizenship question proposal, calling it a Republican ploy to scare immigrants into not participating in the census. That would lead to a population undercount in Democratic-leaning areas with high immigrant populations.

They say that officials lied about their motivations for adding the question and that the move would help Trump’s fellow Republicans gain seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and state legislatures when new electoral district boundaries are drawn.

The Supreme Court on June 27 blocked Trump’s first effort to add the question, faulting the administration’s stated reason. The legal fight seemed to be over earlier in the week when the government said it would start printing census forms without the citizenship question. But the battle reignited last Wednesday when Trump reversed course via tweet.

“We’re working on a lot of things including an executive order,” Trump told reporters last Friday outside the White House as he left for his resort in Bedminster, New Jersey.

Truth is adding the citizenship question to the census is popular with voters.

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